Living in the Blitz

Lest we forget
Fogbrain
Posts: 54
Joined: Tue Jan 17, 2017 8:09 pm

Re: Living in the Blitz

Postby Fogbrain » Sat Feb 18, 2017 10:07 pm

kiwi wrote:Voluntary Aid Detachment,Tower Bridge Road,Bermondsey,1940s. Picture believed to have been taken at Flint Street School, Flint St.
This was taken in the playground of Fair Street School; the rear of Devon Mansions in the background.
Last edited by Fogbrain on Sat Feb 18, 2017 10:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.

kiwi
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Joined: Sat Jan 14, 2017 2:53 am

Re: Living in the Blitz

Postby kiwi » Sun Feb 26, 2017 9:20 pm

blitz2.jpg
BLITZ.
1KG incendiary Bomb that was dropped in such large numbers.jpg
1KG incendiary Bomb that was dropped in such large numbers.jpg

kiwi
Posts: 2603
Joined: Sat Jan 14, 2017 2:53 am

Re: Living in the Blitz

Postby kiwi » Mon Mar 06, 2017 6:38 am

bomb3.jpg

kiwi
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Joined: Sat Jan 14, 2017 2:53 am

Re: Living in the Blitz

Postby kiwi » Sat Mar 18, 2017 10:48 pm

The Den had led a charmed life but was hit on 19th April 1943.
Millwall.jpg
Millwall.png

Millwall,The Den after a night of German bombing in London c1943.  X.jpg
Millwall,The Den after a night of German bombing in London c1943.
Last edited by kiwi on Sat Nov 03, 2018 11:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.

kiwi
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Re: Living in the Blitz

Postby kiwi » Sat Mar 18, 2017 10:53 pm

Docks on fire.gif
The Docks on fire on Black Saturday. 7th September 1940.

kiwi
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Re: Living in the Blitz

Postby kiwi » Wed Mar 22, 2017 1:42 am

On the night of 19th October 1917, a Navy L45 Zeppelin dropped a 600kg bomb which destroyed a row containing three houses, a fish and chip shop and a doctor’s surgery, killing 12 people and injuring a further 24.
BLITZ, Calmington Road,Albany Road, 1917..jpg
Calmington Road,Albany Road, 1917.
Calmington Road, Plaque..jpg
Calmington Road, Plaque.After the Second World War the houses in this area where removed to make way for Burgess Park and the plaque was moved to the Southwark Council offices in Chumleigh Gardens.


I came across this story that relates to these pictures, concerning these three very brave men.

During the night of October 19-20, 1917 a German Zeppelin dropped a 300lb ordnance, known as an aerial torpedo, on to two adjoining houses on the corner of Calmington Road and Albany Road.
The victims of the air raid are remembered on the memorial in nearby Chumleigh Gardens, but three brave policemen, who attended the terrible scene, have been forgotten.
Despite the threat of another explosion due to a gas leak, Inspector Frederick Wright, PC Jesse Christmas and PC Robert Melton raced to the scene – then in the Metropolitan Borough of Camberwell, now in Southwark borough.
It must have been terrifying, voluntarily entering the inferno, not knowing what they would find.
People remember the horrors of the London Blitz of 1940/41 but men, women and children were also killed in air raids during the First World War.
PC Melton was off duty at the time, just a few houses down from the explosion at 24 Albany Road with his wife, Kate, and their two young children, Ethel and George.
All three officers were based at the police station in Walworth Road, popularly known as Carter Street police station.
On their arrival at the scene, the brave Camberwell bobbies cut a hole in the floor and dropped down into the basement, where they managed to find two children in the smoke and chaos.
Ignoring the threat of the building collapsing and the near-overpowering gas fumes, they led the children and a group of shell-shocked adults to safety.
Inspector Wright collapsed, received medical care, went home, and then returned to his rescue efforts later on in the night.
An eye witness spoke of “the great bravery” of the three police officers in a letter to a local paper that week.
He said: “I can assert that their conduct was exemplary, deserving the highest possible praise and public gratitude.”
Inspector Frederick Wright was awarded the Albert Medal for his bravery, while the two police constables were decorated with the King’s Police Medals.
But what became of the three brave bobbies? PC Jesse Christmas and his wife Frances lived at 33 Aylesbury Road in Walworth and in 1919 they welcomed a son, Leslie, into their family.
They later moved to Wandsworth where Jesse died in 1979. Inspector Wright retired in 1920 after 31 years’ service but PC Robert Melton did not remain in the Met Police.
After the First World War, Robert supported a national campaign to improve the pay and conditions of police officers, he even went on strike.
In the Met, 1,056 of the 18,200 police officers employed came out on strike, but this was against the rules and they were all sacked, including Robert.
Robert Melton continued to live with his family at 24 Albany Road and, after being sacked, he took a job as a Gate Keeper at the Rotherhithe docks. Tragedy struck on July 1 1934 when he died from heart failure at the age of 53.
Three selfless and brave policemen who put themselves in incredible danger to try to save the lives of others.
Last edited by kiwi on Mon Sep 16, 2019 3:53 am, edited 1 time in total.

kiwi
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Re: Living in the Blitz

Postby kiwi » Wed Mar 22, 2017 1:51 am

Blitz, Darnell Road, Albany Rd. WW2..jpg
Restoring bomb-damaged houses WW2 in Dartnell Road, now the site of the lake in Burgess Park, Albany Road

paperboy
Posts: 38
Joined: Fri Feb 24, 2017 7:42 pm

Re: Living in the Blitz

Postby paperboy » Fri Mar 24, 2017 8:15 am

Kiwi - what was the point of the War Department Markers? I can see they carry the Ordnance Survey benchmark arrow which was used by OS surveyors until GPS became established but that benchmark had been taken from the army's ordnance department, where the OS started.

kiwi
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Re: Living in the Blitz

Postby kiwi » Mon Mar 27, 2017 9:37 am

Hi Paperboy, you were on the right track.
They were used basically for ordnance survey use. They were positioned by the war department (or the Ministry of Defence as they are now known) and will have distances from each point to the boundary of their land.
As you say they carry the Ordnance Survey benchmark arrow. There is also an engrailed Broad Arrow called a Pheon. Not sure if this the particular Arrow but currently it is a criminal offence in the United Kingdom to reproduce the broad arrow without authority.
arrow.png
Another useless bit of information
:|

paperboy
Posts: 38
Joined: Fri Feb 24, 2017 7:42 pm

Re: Living in the Blitz

Postby paperboy » Mon Mar 27, 2017 6:01 pm

Thanks kiwi.


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