HAVIL STREET.

Yesterday & Today
How we lived then & How we live now
kiwi
Posts: 2788
Joined: Sat Jan 14, 2017 2:53 am

HAVIL STREET.

Postby kiwi » Thu Jan 31, 2019 12:01 am

Looking at a 1930s map it shows a pub on the left side not the right,I would think that is more right than me, sorry :oops:
Havil Street Junction Southampton Way. Orange Tree Pub on the right of Havil Street which shut down in 1999. Rainbow Street is opposite..jpg
Havil Street Junction Southampton Way. Orange Tree Pub on the right of Havil Street which shut down in 1999.
Havil Street Junction 2017, same location.jpg
Havil Street Junction 2017, same location.Rainbow Street is opposite.

Havil Street, Mr G H Locks Shop at number 31,in 1938..jpg
31 Havil Street, Mr G H Locks shop in 1938.
Havil St, Somerset House, 1979.jpg
Havil St, Somerset House, 1979.>>>>>>>
Last edited by kiwi on Mon Jan 13, 2020 8:09 am, edited 1 time in total.

kiwi
Posts: 2788
Joined: Sat Jan 14, 2017 2:53 am

Re: HAVIL STREET.

Postby kiwi » Thu Feb 14, 2019 11:33 pm

Havil Street Workhouse and Infirmary 2001.jpg
Havil Street Workhouse and Infirmary, 2018 . In 1890 the wonderful circular ward building was added.

Sean.Byrne
Posts: 226
Joined: Sun Dec 08, 2019 1:23 pm
Location: Toronto

Re: HAVIL STREET.

Postby Sean.Byrne » Mon Dec 23, 2019 6:27 am

The Havil Street Workhouse was established in 1818 as one of three main sites in Camberwell. It was a long and narrow two-storey brick building, which was already being criticised in an 1865 report in The Lancet for being dilapidated, unfit for purpose and for not treating the infirm as sick patients. As for the food available to inmates, Simon Fowler recalls the dire state of affairs at Havil Street in his book Workhouse:

In the late 1880s a guardian of Camberwell workhouse in southeast London, Miss Augusta Brown, tried to improve the soup served there, which was made out of water, onions and grease. She took a bowl of it to the board meeting, but her fellow guardians refused to touch it. As the soup had already been rejected by her cat and dog, she thought that wise.

By 1890, the transition towards medicalised care had begun and the call for a new infirmary was answered when a circular tower was added to the workhouse site. By this time, St Gile’s Hospital had already opened just next to the workhouse near Brunswick Park. It served the people of Camberwell from 1875 right up until 1983. Much of the original administration and staff-residential blocks of the hospital are still standing, and are now housing. The workhouse site later operated as an infirmary until it was heavily damaged by a V1 flying bomb during the Second World War. All that remains of the Havil Street workhouse is the elegant circular infirmary tower that dominates the low-rise modern housing estate that surrounds it on all sides (see kiwi’s pic above)


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