SOUTHAMPTON WAY.

Yesterday & Today
How we lived then & How we live now
Sean.Byrne
Posts: 226
Joined: Sun Dec 08, 2019 1:23 pm
Location: Toronto

Re: Topics

Postby Sean.Byrne » Fri Dec 13, 2019 3:58 pm

Sean.Byrne wrote:I have just found this site and what a thrill. I have lived in Canada for 52 years and left the general Bermondsey, Camberwell, Peckham area in 1956 to move to Wimbledon. I was shocked to see an image of #7-9 Riddell Street posted by Kiwi. I was born at #30 and we left Riddell St in 1956 when it was designated for redevelopment and the residents were scattered across London to various new communities, including my friend Brian Foxwell. This post by Kiwi is the only photo of Riddell St that I know of and whilst I am not sure, the little girl in the picture might be my little sister Rita. This picture brought a tear to my eye. MANY thanks for the site and to Kiwi



Looking back I get a chuckle when I remember that all of the residents pronounced Riddell as Riddle. No French affectations for us Riddlers!

kiwi
Posts: 2788
Joined: Sat Jan 14, 2017 2:53 am

Re: SOUTHAMPTON WAY.

Postby kiwi » Fri Dec 13, 2019 8:41 pm

Southampton Way, No 205-221, c1955.  X.png
205-221 Southampton Way c1955. Shakespeare pub left.
Southampton Way, General Lying-In Hospital,No 71-79. X.png
71-79, General Lying-In Hospital, Southampton Way.

Sean.Byrne
Posts: 226
Joined: Sun Dec 08, 2019 1:23 pm
Location: Toronto

Re: SOUTHAMPTON WAY.

Postby Sean.Byrne » Sat Dec 14, 2019 5:32 am

Kiwi, thanks for the above pics. The one on the left is an extension of the pic that I posted in this thread of the intersection of Southampton Way and Riddell Street. I had forgotten that this short parade of shops included the Shakespeare pub but your pic reminded me of the cream coloured wall tiles.

The pic on the right is really interesting. I do not remember the hospital but in the small shop on the right part of the window signage says “Maxwell Bagwash”. In those days Victorian terraced homes like mine on Riddell Street did not have washing machines. One way of doing the wash was in a tub by hand, rinse it and then press out the water in a mangle like the pic. The other way was to take a big bag of dry laundry to our local Maxwell Bagwash. As a 7 year old I was happy to help Mum by running it down there with a big bag slung over my shoulder. The Bagwash was wash only, no dry. It was hung out in the yard on a clothesline to dry. I still remember one trip home where the bag of sodden laundry was so heavy that I could barely manage it. I had to keep stopping but I made it home. I have never forgotten how hard that trip was for me.

Also on your pic on the right there is a sign over the Maxwell Bagwash sign that displays “A. Abbot”. That is also the name of the tripe shop in my pic of Southampton Way and Riddell Street, so obviously the same family. Not sure if there are multiple businesses in this place or if A. Abbot owned Maxwells. There is some window signage to the right and left of the A. Abbot sign but I cannot make it out. Too bad.

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Sean.Byrne
Posts: 226
Joined: Sun Dec 08, 2019 1:23 pm
Location: Toronto

Re: SOUTHAMPTON WAY.

Postby Sean.Byrne » Sat Dec 14, 2019 5:50 am

214 Southampton Way 1972

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Sean.Byrne
Posts: 226
Joined: Sun Dec 08, 2019 1:23 pm
Location: Toronto

Re: SOUTHAMPTON WAY.

Postby Sean.Byrne » Sat Dec 14, 2019 6:09 am

214a Southampton Way 1976 next door to the above picture

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Sean.Byrne
Posts: 226
Joined: Sun Dec 08, 2019 1:23 pm
Location: Toronto

Re: SOUTHAMPTON WAY.

Postby Sean.Byrne » Sat Dec 14, 2019 6:15 am

In the above picture you can see 214a and in the pic below you can see 214a again at the far end. Below one of the stores is Ella's Café. The stores are boarded up in this 1976 pic so likely just about to be demolished.

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Sean.Byrne
Posts: 226
Joined: Sun Dec 08, 2019 1:23 pm
Location: Toronto

Re: SOUTHAMPTON WAY.

Postby Sean.Byrne » Sat Dec 14, 2019 9:06 am

A memorial plaque to Robert Browning at 177


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Sean.Byrne
Posts: 226
Joined: Sun Dec 08, 2019 1:23 pm
Location: Toronto

Re: SOUTHAMPTON WAY.

Postby Sean.Byrne » Thu Jan 09, 2020 8:35 pm

I remember as a little boy walking from my home at Southampton Way and Riddell Street to gaze at the wonderful bikes at this Gillott store at 177-181 Southampton Way. Mr. Gillott might have been one of the store personnel that took time to chat with me. You can see an invoice from 1952 to a Mr. K. W. Brash in far away Plymouth. There is a picture of the original store at 177-181 and a picture of the same today. These before and after pictures have me feeling nostalgic!!!

Here is a background on the Gillot Business. It mentions Edwardes Bicycles at 221 Camberwell Road. Edwardes is still there and my dad knew Mr. Edwardes the owner who gave me a pretty good discount on a new bike.

Arthur Gillott set up shop at 179 Southampton Way in 1921. He sold general ironmongery and bicycles called 'Hamptons'. These were bought in. Prior to owning the shop he was a stonemason. He employed Harry Carrington in 1929 who worked his way up to manager by 1939. Arthur Gillott had opened a second shop in Atlantic Avenue, Brixton. In the last months of WW2 Harry had foreseen the market for quality lightweights and arranged to have Jim Collier released from war work at Woolwich Arsenal. Jim had been a master builder at Hobbs of Barbican pre-war.

Frame building began in May 1945. The period of peak production was late '40's to early '50's. 5 Builders were at work including Ron Cooper who joined in 1947, tutored by Bill Philbrook and Len Hart. Len Truman and George Holt also built.

A few tandems were built and fewer trikes as well as machines for disabled riders. Their 'Alpine Tourist DeLuxe' was IMHO the closest any British builder came to the classic French style tourer. The attention to detail included a small plate with the frame number stamped on it brazed onto the head tube next to the badge. After all, who wants to turn a fully laden tourer upside down to satisfy a curious customs man? Gillott's never built for other suppliers, all frames being built to order except for the 'Continental' and a batch of lugless frames for stock.

Arthur Gillott died in 1955 aged 73. Harry sold the business to Edwardes of Camberwell in February 1963 and carried on as manager until 1966. Ron Cooper was still building Gillotts from the original shop until 1967. He left then and set up on his own in 1970. He concentrated on his own marque but some Gillotts were still ordered and built. The famous name is now owned by Mark Joynt of Omega Cycles.

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